Bio - Benjamin Hewett

Benjamin Hewett

Ben (B.Arch (hons. 1st class) UNSW) is a registered Architect and Director of Offshorestudio. He has had extensive design and practice experience in a large variety of project types, with past roles in the NSW Government Architect’s Office, private practice, various collaborations, and as a Design Director with Crone Partners Architecture Studios. Currently Ben is a Lecturer with the School of Architecture at the University of Technology in Sydney, as well as a Design Consultant to Crone Partners. He joined Offshorestudio in 2007.

As Design Director with Crone Partners, Ben designed a large variety of project types including luxury apartments to high-density residential, small scale retail/commercial buildings to 40 storey twin towers, as well as masterplans, exhibition centres and luxury houses. Sites range from Sydney’s CBD, Manly, Victoria Park, and Rhodes in Sydney, to country New South Wales, Newcastle, Brisbane, Dubai, Pakistan and China.

Ben has worked with the Government Architect Design Directorate [now Government Architect’s Office] between 1991-2001, during which time he worked on the award winning Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the Redevelopment of Circular Quay, and Parramatta Children’s Court. Ben was also a leading member of the design team for Manly Hydraulics Laboratory (RAIA Architecture Award for Public Buildings, Commendation, 2000), various schemes for cultural facilities for Pier 2/3 in Walsh Bay (working directly with Philippe Robert and Chris Johnson, NSW Government Architect), as well as a number of schools, hospitals and art galleries. In various periods of private practice Ben has worked on a variety of houses and small commercial feasibility studies.

Ben has tutored and lectured design part-time since 1999 . In 2005 he joined UTS as casual tutor in 5th Year Architecture, before starting 2006 in a full-time role. His current roles at the University of Technology, Sydney involve the coordination and lecturing of senior level design subjects.


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